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Temporary Protected Status urged for Central Americans
January 25, 2016

Temporary Protected Status urged for Central Americans
TPS was created by Congress with the passage of the Immigration Act of 1990 to address gaps in U.S. immigration policy and regularize the process by which our government accommodated those gaps. (Jesuit Refugee Service)
Read the full letter
For the last six years, the Northern Triangle countries have ranked within the world’s top four countries for rates of femicide, while El Salvador and Guatemala have the highest homicide rates in the world among children.

(Washington, D.C.) January 25, 2016 — Jesuit Refugee Service/USA joined 272 civil rights, labor rights, faith-based, immigrant, human rights, humanitarian, and legal service organizations in a letter to President Obama, the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Homeland Security asking the U.S. to designate El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras for Temporary Protected Status.

The three countries — collectively known as the Northern Triangle — warrant TPS designation in light of the dramatically escalating violence that has precipitated a humanitarian crisis of refugees fleeing the Northern Triangle countries. 

In 2015, the death toll in the Northern Triangle of Central America was 17,500, higher than in all but three zones of ongoing armed conflict: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Syria. This rapidly escalating violence occurred in a geographic region the size of the state of Oregon and home to just under 30 million people. To put this endemic violence into perspective, Honduras alone had more homicides than the 28 states of the European Union combined in 2014.

For the last six years, the Northern Triangle countries have ranked within the world’s top four countries for rates of femicide, while El Salvador and Guatemala have the highest homicide rates in the world among children. 

TPS was created by Congress with the passage of the Immigration Act of 1990 to address gaps in U.S. immigration policy and regularize the process by which our government accommodated those gaps. Congress understood that a stay of deportation and employment authorization are necessary for nationals who are already in the United States but who cannot be deported safely due to temporary conditions in their home countries. 

The risk of deportation to the Northern Triangle countries is tangible and profound. According to a comprehensive study conducted by social scientist Elizabeth Kennedy at San Diego State University, between January 2014 and September 2015, at least 83 nationals deported to El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala were reported to have been subsequently murdered, with 45 murders in El Salvador, 35 in Honduras, and three in Guatemala. 

Read the full letter here.



Press Contact Information
Mr Christian Fuchs
christian.fuchs@jrs.net
202-629-5946